Biggest Ant in the World – Complete Information 

The biggest ant in the world is Dinoponera. Dinoponera is a South American ant genus in the Ponerinae subfamily, sometimes known as tocandiras or Giant Amazonian Ant.

Dinoponera is a genus found only in South America, ranging from montane rainforest on the eastern slope of the Andes in Peru and Colombia, Ecuador to savannah and lowland rainforest in Guyana, Brazil, Bolivia, Argentina, and Paraguay.

Dinoponera ants normally live in nests at the base of trees up to 16 inches deep and separated into several chambers.

Biggest Ant in the World, black color ant

Dinoponera ants have 72–98 workers in a colony (usually less than 100), though colony size varies by species.

Dinoponera, the gigantic ant, has a powerful sting that can inflict significant discomfort for up to 2 days. However, it will be less painful compared to a Bullet Ant bite.

How Big is the Biggest Ant in the World?

A Dinoponera (Giant Amazon Ant) has a body length of 3-4 cm (1.2 -1.6 inches). The most noticeable feature that distinguishes Dinoponera from other genera is its size.

Is the Bullet Ant the Biggest Ant in the World?

No, Dinoponera (Giant Amazonian Ant) is the largest, with a body length of 3–4 cm (1.2–1.6 in) compared to the bullet ant, which has a body length of 1.8–3 cm (0.7–1.2 in).

Is the Bullet Ant is the World's Biggest Ant

Biggest Ant Queen in the World

Dinoponera (Giant Amazonian Ant) queens are the largest, reaching 3-4 cm in length (1.2-1.6 inches).

What was the Biggest Ant that Ever Lived

What was the Biggest Ant that Ever Lived?

Titanomyrma gigantea is the largest ant ever to have lived on Earth. It was thought to have lived 49.5 million years ago. In 2011, the first fossil was discovered.

Titanomyrma gigantea is the largest gigantic ant yet discovered, measuring more than 5cm (2 inches) in length and located in Central and East Africa. 

Titanomyrma fossils show that males could reach 3cm (1.2 inches) while queens could reach 6cm (2.4 inches). It had about 15cm wingspan (5.9 inches).

References

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/invertebrates/facts/ants

https://www.britannica.com/animal/ant

https://www.nwf.org/Educational-Resources/Wildlife-Guide/Invertebrates/Ants

https://www.guinnessworldrecords.com/world-records/341623-largest-ant-species-ever